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20121202
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English 26
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
with respect to united nations convention on this they are fairly outrageous. and what they're looking for, at the end of the day is respect, respect out the table and respect for who they are and what they are doing. and semi-we can define the means to bring these two solitudes together because at the end of the day any conflicts, whether it's kinetic or otherwise, that adversely affects the sultry to that part of the world will have a fundamentally adverse impact on the global economy spent it's doing it now with china and japan. that's interesting, as you've got two of the biggest economies in the world in a nightmare situation that raises a fundamental question, and it's of ending this myth that economics draws people closer together. part of the title today is "mischief or miscalculation?." during the cold war, what was interesting is you can have 17 different spheres of contact with the soviets and if two and if to implement you it's about 15 others. there was a lot of heavy investment figuring out how to communicate and how to coordinate, how to deal with escalation, how do you talk
to the senator and i understand colleagues on the other side of the aisle have concerns about the united nations and i respect that. we've had the space before, but i'm having difficulty finding where the threat gains any reality the senator has described specifically with respect to children the senator mentioned the question of the committee being created and sometimes committee make recommendations outside the purview of something. while that may be true, but when have words -- i guess the senator, when have words or suggestions that have no power, they cannot be implemented, but have no access to the courts, that have no effect on the web the united states and cannot change the lot of the united states, when has that ever threatened anybody in our country? >> one of the united states ratifies -- >> does the senator agreed there's no power to change our love? >> no, i don't agree. >> and the senator show where it is specifically when the supreme court has held this is not self-executing. there's no access to american courts when it is clear by the statements of the treaty itself there's no la
on the bill in 19 ott. this was sufficient to block it. the treaty was adopted by the united nations six years ago and has since been ratified by 126 countries, just not the united states. even a last-minute appeal by former senator bob dole himself a disabled veteran, as well as every major veterans group and even the chamber of commerce could not sway senate republicans. but this is what has become of the republican party. a party whose views often dissend to the lowest common denominator and defined by paranoid fears of the u.n. that are devoid of any fact whatsoever. so one could understand harry reid's frustration in trying to negotiate with republicans when he vented, and i quote, it's difficult to engage in rational negotiation when one side holds well-known facts and proven truths in such low esteem. senator reid is spot on or more on what it means for the disabilities community i'm met with the ceo how shocked are you that it could not be ratified by the united states senate. >> when it comes down to it, i was floored. there is no reason in this day and age when a treaty that is focus
last 22 years to find out how we did it, what they can do. so here was the united nations who said okay, we'll come up with a convention, a treaty, all countries, put it out for them to sign up which encourages them to pale actually emulate what we did. this would have given us a seat at the table. we would be sitting at the table, helping other countries to bring their laws more up to what ours are in terms of the rights of people with disabilities. but we turned our backs on that. turned our backs on it. you know, mr. president, if -- there are a lot of things that make america a shining city on a hill but there's one thing that no one can dispute that does put america as a shining city on a hill, and that is the americans with disabilities act, and what it has done to our society. like our civil rights act. what it's done to break down the barriers and to show that people with disabilities can contribute to society, if only given the chance and the opportunity. i would think that we would want for them to then say yes, we'll be a part of a worldwide effort to break down those barrier
recognized by the united nations. the joy short-lived. how israel's decision to pursue even more settlements in the west bank and east jerusalem may kill any hopes of peace. we'll dive deep lie into this issue. >>> rp says it's not changing plans for the controversial housing development in east of jerusalem also developments in east jerusalem. this is despite getting a diplomatic mackdown recently from australia, five european countries and the united states bought in on this yesterday. now here's why this is such a big deal. the proposed construction would effectively cut off the west bank from cities of like bethlehem and ramallah, will cut them off from jerusalem. and that's important for the palestinians, it would mean that they couldn't get to east jerusalem, which they would eventually claim as the capital of their nation if that is to be. the large israeli settlement town of ma ale adumim would be connected to jerusalem directly. vice president for new initiatives and a distinguished scholar at the woodrow wilson international center. always good to talk to you. israel defined as i i
into orbit, allegedly using technology banned by the united nations. at the live desk, melissa mollet, news 4. >>> the owner of a bangladesh clothing factory where over 100 people were killed in a fire last june lost his fire certification in june. he was only allowed to build a three-story facility. he illegally expanded it to eight floors and was adding a ninth. >>> this morning civilians in syria are being warned not to go to the country's airport. the military is targeting damascus airport, saying civilians and airlines should not go near it. this comes as the world watches to see if the government uses chemical weapons on its own civilians. since march of last year, 40,000 people have been killed in the ongoing violence. >>> today the supreme court could announce if it will take up challenges to same-sex marriage. there are ten cases pending. the justices are expected to review california's proposition 8, which bans same-sex marriage in that state. this is the last weekly conferences before the court before its holiday recess. if the judges don't make a decision on same-sex marriage case
threat to the united states' national security. as chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, i got asked that all the time. i answered in two words: our debt. i think i surprised him. today 15 former senior national security officials who served across eight presidential administrations have formed a coalition to stress the need for elected officials to act. for not only has the passage of time exacerbated some of the economic problems, it has revealed a perhaps equally-dangerous political one. our inability to grapple with pressing fiscal challenges represents nothing less than a crisis in our democratic order. compounding the instability and unpredictability in a volatile world. our propositions for this coalition are simple. the national security of the united states depends on its economic health. that health must be insured by averting the immediate crises and by laying the groundwork for a rigorous, long-term program of debt reduction, smart investment, economic growth and lower income inequality. in national security spending, we can target investments much more efficiently in res
't believe the u.n. should sign on as party to any united nations convention and because a two-thirds super majority is rard to ratify a treaty, that opposition means it will be close and they may lose. yesterday kerry told reporters he is about four votes short but thinks a handful of senators might still be willing to sign on. in an effort to win those 11th hour votes, former senator bob dole who was there when the ada, americans for disability act, was negotiated and signed in the early '90s, is expected to be present on the senate floor or at least right next to the floor when the vote actually takes place. of course dole was just optized at walter reed army medical center last week. his public appearances are very, very rare these days. he'll be honored late they are morning and then he'll be sitting there watching as some senators potentially walk by him to make that decision to vote against a treaty that he has been campaigning very hard for. the tough time this treaty is having is the latest sign of the growing isolationist party. yesterday the president used a speech celebrating th
was elected and at the united nations signed and that dnot rep and bear arms and the united states would be signing on to a worldwide treaty with countries like syria and iran, in which would water down our right to bare arms. >> i noticed there was a spike in gun sales after the election, why is that? >> well, because of those things and president obama's history and the first term of regulations and executive orders, things like that to try to restrict guns, so, people are want to get guns and may be restricted and worried about government having guns and they reported that black friday was the single biggest sale of firearms in the history this have country and november was the single biggest for gun sales. >> mike: over the last 11 months in this country a new study came out. 2.5 million times in in country over the last 11 months, crimes have been prevented because of guns. >> where does the anti-gun group get it wrong? >> it was exactly, bob costas said. i think he actually said on this network, that guns always make situations more dangerous and saying things like that is just fa
will boost the leverage in future peace talks. >> united nations meeting in dubai is looking to update how the world the government deals with the world wide web. a lot of people are not too sure what will come out of this. 123 people u.s. delegation like a will and microsoft are worried that and and that security could be used to justify with blocks. the gathering will confront questions that include how much sway the you in can exert over efforts. and expanding the internet and to developing nations. >> john mcafee is living the life of a fugitive. he blocked an unconfirmed report saying he was arrested on the border of police in mexico. he is running from police who want to question him about the death of his neighbor. the report of his arrest came within 24 hours of him giving his first and person interviews into making a run for it. the mayor of san pedro told the panel's report of his apprehension are not true. police in belize are san they have no idea where he is or what city he has supposedly been captured in. coming up on the kron for morning news and live look at the james lick
and information to follow up on. the united nations and from a program says the burning of coal is the single most largest anthropogenic source of mercury air emissions, have a more than tripled since 1970. coal burning is increasing alongside at it -- alongside economic growth. this is from a report. there was a report done by the university of texas that showed a statistically significant link between pounds of industrial release of mercury and increased austism rates. autism prevalence was reduced by 1% to 10% from the pollution source. the background of the study was that during the time the studied by the texas team, they quoted the us epa estimating environmental mercury releases at 158 million tons annually nationwide in the late 1990's. when will -- are you aware of any studies other than this texas study that has a link between neurotoxic chemicals and the environment and increased rates of autism ? >> i am aware of other studies, for instance the one i mentioned earlier, looking at auto emissions and pregnancy early in life. clearly an association between that exposure and autism rates.
of the acceptance in the united nations. the u.s. rejected the decision. a hurricane sandy victim surprised with a new genority. >> there is not a word in the dictionary to express my appreciation and openance at this moment. that is 95 year old pete who was living without heat or water and power. a contractor saw the story and rebuilt the house from top to bottomment >> he didn't know me from adam and look. see what he did. he's wonderful. >> the contractor said he plan to help more storm victims rebuild their lives. >> finally a happy ending. >> should illegals get a break on in state tuition on the backs of legal students. outrage from constitients forced one to fight back. >> steve: how can you make your relationship work? the answer is right under your nose? what does that mean? we'll explain straight ahead. >> our next gests said it is it not fair to taxpayers and wanting to resprerse that policy. massachusetts governor duval patrick. how important is it now. james lyons. representative, why does this bother you so much? >> it is it sending the wrong message. the governor is forcing t
of these foreign national students trained in these stem fields to stay here in the united states and help create jobs here in the united states. this bill actually goes a step further, and what it does is it provides them a green card, a green card, which is the first step toward a path to citizenship. if you believe that this is a self-inflicted wound on our economy, you're exactly right, our current policy. we're educating brilliant students and then compelling them to go to work in shanghai or singapore rather than san antonio or the silicon valley. meanwhile, we're handing out tens of thousands of diversity visas to immigrants chosen by a random lottery, without regard to any qualifications they might when it comes to job creation and entrepreneurship. it makes absolutely no sense. i believe we need an immigration policy that serves our national interest. and if there's one thing that we need more than anything else now is we need job creators and entrepreneurs in the united states. and we know in the -- in the global economy, it's people with the special skills in science, technology, engin
violations of human rights. iran has refused access to the united nations special reperteur on human rights. in september, 2011, the un secretary-general submitted a report to the general assembly in which he said he was "deeply troubled by reports of increased numbers of executions, amputations, arbitrary arrests and detentions, unfair trials, torture, and ill treatment and bemoaned the crackdown on human rights activists, lawyers, journalists, and opposite -- and opposition activists." one example from the week's news -- there was what qualifies in i ran as a some good news -- a well-known human rights lawyer ended her 49-day hunger strike on december four. she has been imprisoned since 2010 and the regime had imposed a travel ban on her husband and 12-year-old daughter. she was on a hunger strike for 49 days and has actually stopped of thunderstrike amid an indication that the regime will lift the travel ban. the victories are small and hard won and the news is relentlessly negative. but it comes at an interesting moment both for iran which has parliamentary collections of next june typi
's called forces. if they want to do something, to speak out against austerity and cuts, the national nurses united and anew is holding demonstrations in 20 cities next monday, tomorrow and people can find out more and get active in favor of the transaction tax or the robin hood tax where they live. get involved in this fight now. >> dave? >> you should know that gay soldiers are still hurting, particularly in their relationships. i've been following two officers in hiding for 12 years now. it's really, really hard to have a boyfriend. when i see michelle obama and dr. biden doing this great work with military families, it's incredible the outreach they're doing and having the importance of the entire family unit. with gay people, even after don't ask don't tell, they're usually excluded from that. there are a thousand different other reasons that make it really hard. but when i did my piece, i am expanding now for a book, in 2000 we called it don't ask, don't tell, don't fall in love. that turned out to be the hard part. they can ask now and tell you about it's hard to fall in love. >> unre
to become the most read filipino newspaper in the united states with circulation of 120,000. he's founding chairperson of national federation of philippine american association, been a voice for immigrants rights, farm workers struggle and -- equity for over five decades. last month he received a lifetime achievement award from the filipino-american press club. he is survived by his wife and seven kids. >> clerk calvillo: thank you, supervisor avalos. supervisor mar. >> supervisor mar: thank you. i first wanted to ask if we could -- meeting in memorium for fay bingham. she passed away november 2, 2012 at the age of 91. she was born in harrison, southh dakota. she moved to san francisco and resided in richmond for at least -- for the last 56 years. she was a long time member of local 2, the hotel and restaurant workers union and worked at the fairmont hotel, and also at the st. francis hotel and ended her career at the bakery. she is preceded in death by her husband who served three years in the coast guard and 30 in the navy. fay will be missed by her two sisters in michigan plus many her
point. on your second point, the opec nations in being friends of the united states, i think the answer to that is that both sides have had a relationship that has been economically necessary, but i do not think the opec cartel conducts its affairs in a way to benefit the united states of america. they conduct their affairs so that they do not kill the goose that laid the golden egg. if you turn into the record on pages 8 and 9, you're asking for some visual clues as to what's going on here. if you look on page 8 coming will see the united states is paying about $20 million per month to import petroleum. you see the sharp rise in the line just before 2008 and then it sort of flat lines from 2008 going through the significant dip that was represented by the subprime mortgage meltdown. what's interesting about it is from that point forward it has remained about 50% of the balance of payments and deficits. that is because the oil cartel prices the marginal barrel of oil as what it costs to get it out of the ground and what the maximum is that they cannot pay without tipping the consumers o
not only with the national domestic workers alliance, the domestic workers united here in the new york, i think we see the emergence of a 21st century labor movement. discovering solidarity and action and being willing to take the risk with a lot of support around them to step out and say, no, these are my rights. i want the right to organize. i want these labor protections and i'm willing to do whatever it takes to get them. >> i want to come to you as soon as we come back. the fact that you are a doctoral candidate in sociology after the story you told us is fascinating and worth hearing more about. i also want to ask whether or not labor laws can make a difference for domestic workers when we come back. this holiday, share everything. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. sharable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. get a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supp
to a balance plan to put our national debt act down to sustainable levels. the united states i believe is that a critical junction. we can come together and show the world that we still have responsible actors. people are watching, do we still have it? i spent a few days last fall meeting with the european leaders meeting with finance ministers and the head of the european commission to try to get a sense of europe. they have got to find a way to work out all of their differences to save the euro. i believe they will. you can see it and feel it. they will find a way. they will muddle through, but they will find a way to get it done. these countries are also looking to us. we need to lead. uncertainty leads business -- leaves the business is the sidelines. -- at the sidelines. they do not higher, especially with all that cash. confidence matters. it especially matters in our economy. we need long-term fiscal reductions so people can pine for the future. we need to give families and businesses a certainty and the specific spending cuts specific revenue increases that reduce the deficit a
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, the rest of the national conversation gets distorted and pulled way over to the right. that's what's happening. >> ron, i love the way you suggest that the real patriots are the ones who want to secede from the united states. it reminds me -- we once had a priest named father feeney. he didn't like the church's view because the church didn't support no salvation outside the church. so he leaves the church. that's just like -- wait a minute, you're one of them now. that doesn't make any sense. it's like we're so patriotic, we're going to leave this country. >> we're going to leave the country. they'll have to come up with a new name as they go. it's not just the south. parts of the plains, too, but it would seem to me as long as we could get like from the northeast -- could get air rights over canada to get to the west coast we could keep something of a nation together. >> what would be their preferred nation to join? >> you know they're not going to mexico. >> they ain't going to denmark. they don't like socialism. they're not going to go where all the white people are. what do the
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)